Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program


Dr. Reginald Oputa lecturing at his host institution, Pima Community College.

The Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program assists U.S. higher education institutions in expanding programs of academic exchange. By supporting non-U.S. scholars through grants for teaching at institutions that might not have a strong international component, both the U.S. institution and the scholar grantee benefit.

S-I-R gives preference to the following.

  • Historically Black Colleges and Universities
  • Hispanic-serving institutions
  • Tribal Colleges and Universities
  • Community Colleges
  • Small Liberal Arts institutions
  • Asian-American and Native American/Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISI)
  • American Indian and Alaskan Native (AIANSI)
  • Predominantly Black Institutions (PBI)

There are opportunities for other institutions to partner with preference organizations. Your institution is invited to learn how S-I-R can help advance its international presence, assist in faculty and curriculum development, and diversify the educational experiences of its students, scholars and surrounding community.

Special notice:

For the 2017-18 academic year (October 17th deadline date) the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program offers additional grant opportunities for all U.S. colleges and universities to apply to host scholars or professionals in Cultural Heritage Protection and Preservation from Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Libya or Iraq.

Resources:

  • Webinar | Archive - Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program Overview (May 23, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT)
  • Webinar | Archive - Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program Opportunities for Community Colleges (June 6, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT)
  • Webinar | Archive - Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program Opportunities for MSIs (June 8, 2016 - 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm EDT)
  • Webinar | Archive - Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Opportunities for SLAs and others (June 10, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT)
  • Webinar | Archive - Fulbright S-I-R Application Walk through and Open Questions (June 14, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT)
  • Webinar | Archive - Fulbright S-I-R Final Call for Questions (September 16, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT)
     
  • Guidelines
  • Postcard
  • E-card
  • Flyer
Grant Duration:

A semester to full academic year.

2017-2018 Proposal Deadline:
October 17, 2016

Contact Us:
Cecilia Kocinski-Mulder, sir@iie.org, (202) 686-6240

Host Institution Eligibility:

The focus of the S-I-R is to engage with institutions that are underrepresented within the Fulbright Program.  If your institution is outside the scope of these targeted institutions, S-I-R awards may still be granted.

  • Minority Serving Institutions (Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions AANAPISI,  American Indian and Alaskan Native Serving Institutions AIANSI, Historically Black Colleges and Universities HBCU, Hispanic Serving Institutions HSI, Tribal Colleges and Universities TCU, and Predominately Black Institutions PBI.
  • Community Colleges
  • Small Liberal Arts Colleges

There are opportunities for other institutions to partner with preference organizations. Contact us to learn how S-I-R can help your institution advance its international presence, assist in faculty and curriculum development, and diversify the educational experiences of its students, scholars and surrounding community.

Last year, 46 institutions took advantage of the opportunities provided by the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program to internationalize programs, develop curricula and faculty, and diversify student and faculty experiences. Your institution is invited to learn how it can take advantage of S-I-R benefits in 2017-2018.

Application for Institutions

The Embark application system will allow you to enter, reenter and revise all sections of your application. Remember to periodically save any data you have entered.

Special notice: For the 2017-18 academic year (October 17th deadline date) the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program offers additional grant opportunities for all U.S. colleges and universities to apply to host scholars or professionals in Cultural Heritage Protection and Preservation from Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Libya or Iraq.
 

Application Resources

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Institutions Served By S-I-R

A Unique Collaboration Among Fulbright, Institutions and Surrounding Communities

The Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program is unique among the initiatives under the Fulbright Scholar Program because it is specifically-designed to help institutions, especially those underrepresented in the internationalization of higher education.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Asian-American and Native American/Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions, American Indian and Alaskan Native Serving Institutions, Predominantly Black Institutions, community colleges and small and liberal-arts institutions, are primarily served by the S-I-R Program. Any institution in which a racial or ethnic minority makes up 50 percent or more of enrollment may also participate in S-I-R funding.

A minority-serving institution with a fully-developed international program can also participate in the S-I-R program. But it must clearly demonstrate how the proposed Scholar will significantly enhance or expand an existing international program, serve students, help the campus and benefit the surrounding community. An institution that has participated in S-I-R may also submit a proposal; the proposal will only be considered after proposals from institutions that have not previously participated in the program.

The S-I-R Program also funds collaborations between U.S. institutions looking to host a scholar from outside the United States. Such joint ventures may include an underrepresented institution and a U.S. institution already engaged in some form of campus internationalization or a consortium of institutions looking to improve their global presence.

The benefits provided by S-I-R come by the way of a unique collaboration between four participants…

  • The S-I-R Program provides a stipend of up to $3145 a month, along with travel expenses and an allowance for up to two dependents.
  • The participating institution(s) are encouraged to provide a salary supplement and assistance with professional expenses; housing or other in-kind remuneration can substitute for the salary supplement. The institution is also expected to provide the Scholar-in-Residence with professional development opportunities such as attendance at conferences within the scholar’s discipline.
  • The Scholar-in-Residence works across departments and curricula. This ranges from teaching undergraduate courses to advising on curriculum and faculty development. The institution gains from the expertise provided and the Scholar attains experience in U.S. higher education.
  • The community, through the institution, provides the Visiting Scholar opportunities to participate in speaking engagement, community meetings and other grassroots activities. Through this, the institution can diversify the experiences of – and build goodwill among – the community. The S-I-R Program promotes racial, cultural and intellectual diversity among the college and the wider community.

Opportunities for Institutional Development

Unlike any other program within Fulbright, S-I-R primarily focuses on the needs of institutions. It funds the lecturing work of Visiting Scholars in programs developed by such Historically Black Colleges as Miles College and Hispanic-serving institutions such as Texas A&M University-Kingsville. S-I-R also helps fund Visiting Scholars for lecturing at tribal colleges, community colleges, Asian-American and Native American/Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions - AANAPISI, American Indian and Alaskan Native Serving Institutions – AIANSIs, Tribal Colleges and Universities – TCUs, Predominantly Black Institutions – PBIs  and small, liberal arts institutions. If your institution is not among these groups, it can still submit a proposal for funding.

The S-I-R Program can help your institution leverage its financial, campus and community assets in a collaborative manner. This helps your school achieve short- and long-term goals and gives the Visiting Scholar you host the opportunity to develop their lecturing and technical consulting skills. This approach also helps diversify the international experiences of your surrounding community.

Thank you for your interest in S-I-R and the enriching opportunities it can provide for your institution, faculty, students and community.

Building The Proposal

If you are interested in participating in S-I-R, there are some steps you will need to take in developing a proposal.

It starts with developing the proposed program your institution being submitted for S-I-R funding. The institution must determine whether it has a faculty member outside of the United States in mind for S-I-R funding or needs assistance in recruiting one for the program. This will factor into the S-I-R review process.

  • The proposed scholar should not have taught extensively in the United States within the past five years.
  • Involve the Visiting Scholar in campus and community activities. This may include participating in special lecturing series or even speaking engagements before local community groups and K-12 schools. There are no limits on the range of activities that can be listed in the proposal.
  • The institution must also determine if the potential Scholar-in-Residence has the academic standing needed to teach the courses being proposed. This is a significant factor in determining S-I-R funding. The proposed Visiting Scholar must also have the English-language proficiency needed to conduct teaching.
  • If the institution doesn’t have a faculty in mind, it can request help from CIES, who will work with Fulbright Commissions or U.S. Embassies abroad to recruit a potential Scholar-in-Residence. In order to facilitate the request, the proposal should list one or two countries in the same geographic region from where the institution wishes to have scholars, and provide a rationale for each country.

The institution must then determine how it will incorporate the Scholar-in-Residence into its teaching, curriculum development and campus activities. Your institution must…

  • Show how it will plan the activities of the scholar and oversee whether he or she successfully fulfills proposed activities.

Describe the courses and/or seminars that the Visiting Scholar will teach. List the course title, hours that classes meet per week and anticipated enrollment.

  • Incorporate the Visiting Scholar into faculty meetings and other activity. This ensures that the Scholar-in-Residence is facilitating faculty and institutional development, and allows for the development of their expertise.
  • Show how the contributions of the Scholar-in-Residence can be sustained for the long term. The institution should provide short-term (one-to-five year) and long-term plans for the proposed program and show how the scholar will contribute to sustaining it.
  • Provide professional development opportunities for the Visiting Scholar. This includes participation in national conferences of professional organizations within their particular discipline.
  • Involve the Visiting Scholar in campus and community activities. This may include participating in special lecturing series or even speaking engagements before local community groups. There are no limits on the range of activities that can be listed in the proposal.

Your institution should then assess whether it has the institutional and community resources needed to develop the proposal and successfully gain S-I-R funding. Because of the S-I-R Program’s unique cost-sharing model, your institution must pay for part of the cost of hosting the Visiting Scholar. Although a salary supplement is generally expected to be provided, the institution can substitute that with housing or other in-kind remuneration.

The institution should also work with community groups on developing activities for the proposed Visiting Scholar. This will help build goodwill with the community and help the Scholar-in-Residence gain the experience needed for his or her successful comparative lecturing and advising.

A helpful list of tips for developing a successful application is available, as is the Guidelines for the S-I-R proposal. You can also contact S-I-R Program for additional guidance on developing your proposal.

Regions/Countries Participating in S-I-R

AFRICA, SUB-SAHARAN

Angola
Benin
Botswana
Burkina Faso
Cameroon
Chad
Cote d’Ivoire
Democratic Republic
of Congo
Ethiopia
Ghana
Guinea
Kenya
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Mauritius
Mozambique
Namibia
Niger
Nigeria
Rwanda
Senegal
Sierra Leone
South Africa
Swaziland
Tanzania
Togo
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe

EUROPE AND EURASIA

Albania
Andorra
Armenia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Belarus
Belgium/Luxembourg
Bosnia-Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Georgia
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
Kosovo
Latvia
Lithuania
Macedonia
Malta
Moldova
Montenegro
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russian Federation
Serbia
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
Ukraine
United Kingdom

EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

Australia (only for institutional proposals requesting named scholars)
Brunei
Burma
Cambodia
China
Hong Kong
Indonesia
Japan (only for institutional proposals
requesting named scholars)
Laos
Malaysia
Mongolia
New Zealand
Philippines
Singapore
South Korea
South Pacific
Taiwan
Thailand
Timor-Leste
Vietnam

MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Algeria
Bahrain
Egypt
Israel
Jordan (only for institutional
proposals requesting a named scholar)
Kuwait
Lebanon
Morocco
Oman
Palestinian Territories
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Syria
Tunisia
United Arab Emirates
Yemen

SOUTH AND CENTRAL ASIA

Afghanistan
Bangladesh
India
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyz Republic
Nepal
Pakistan
Sri Lanka
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan

WESTERN HEMISPHERE

Argentina
Bahamas
Barbados
Bolivia
Brazil
Canada
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Jamaica
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Suriname
Trinidad/Tobago
Uruguay
Venezuela

Note: Geographical listings in this publication are a matter of administrative convenience and are not intended to imply a United States government position on the legal status of the areas listed.

Recent S-I-R Awarded Institutions

A list of institutions who have participated in the S-I-R Program is available, along with case studies of successful participants among Historically Black Colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges , other minority serving institutions and small, liberal arts institutions.

 

  1. Review Program Materials

    • May 1, 2016
      The Fulbright S-I-R program is open to new applications for the 2017-2018 academic year. Review our Fulbright S-I-R Guidelines (include link) for a detailed outline of the sections of the application form and narrative proposal.
  2. Participate in Webinars

    • May-September 2016
      Webinars are a great tool to learn about the program, discover tips and tricks for submitting a strong proposal and to hear stories from past hosts. You can find a listing of upcoming and archived webinars here (link or list)
  3. Share Draft Proposal

    • May-October 1, 2016
      S-I-R program staff is happy to review draft proposals or answer any questions related to your proposal throughout the application season. Please send any draft proposals or questions to Cecilia Kocinski-Mulder (sir@iie.org).
  4. Submit Application

Application Review

  • CIES notifies applicant institutions of the review outcome January-April- Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board review recommended proposals while Fulbright Commissions and Public Affairs Sections of US Embassies abroad recruit and/or review prospective scholars. April 2017 onwards CIES issues grant packets to scholars

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Google Map - Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Institutions by location since 2007

Uploaded on June 16, 2016
Source: Google Map
Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Institutions by location since 2007

Institutional Quotes

“Having Dr. Man at our college allowed our students to consider new perspectives, think about new ideas and perform hands-on research in the field of geographic information systems.”

  • Dr. David J. Banville, Instructional Technologist and Fulbright Scholar to Romania (2008-2009)
    Dr. Dee Ludwig, Vice President for Learning
  • Eastern Wyoming College with scholar Titus Man of Romania

“She provided our students with the opportunity to study Chinese literature that otherwise would not have been available to them.”

  • Dr. Paul McVeigh, Associate Vice President for Global Studies and Programs
  • Northern Virginia Community College-Annandale Campus with scholar Dr. Min Ji of China

“Dr. Johnson’s curricular analysis completed during her Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence year lays a solid foundation for future discussion of educational collaborations.”

  • Dr. Donna Fry, Associate Dean and Professor of Physical Therapy
  • University of Michigan-Flint with scholar Dr. Olubusola Johnson of Nigeria

“The students who had her for class and those who attended her programs will have a better idea of the differences and similarities between our cultures and a better appreciation for both differences and similarities.”

  • Amelia Harris, Academic Dean, Department of Communication Studies
  • The University of Virginia’s College at Wise with scholar Dr. Iris-Aya Laemmerhirt of Germany

“Dr. Sadiqi has given us her “insider’s” view of the religious, cultural and political complexities of the Middle Eastern and North Africa regions.  This has generated an awareness of and desire on campus for greater understanding of the region.”

  • Dr. Patricia de Freitas, Professor Emerita
  • Ethnic and Women’s Studies at Cal Poly Pomona with Dr. Fatima Sadiqi of Morocco

“Overall, Prof. Lira de Sousa’s presence on campus has increased interest in Africana Studies, Latin American and Portuguese studies, and, of course, in Brazil.”

  • Prof. Carolina Castellanos Gonella, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
  • Dickinson College with Dr. Ramayana Lira de Sousa of Brazil

“…her presence on our campus was in important reminder of the globalization of our world, of not only what differentiates us, but importantly what we all share.”

  • Thomas Edwards, Provost
  • Thomas College Department of Arts and Sciences with scholar Dr. Deepika Papneja of India

“Everyone who heard her speak was inspired!”

  • Elizabeth Beaulieu, Dean
  • Champlain College with Dr. Rula Quawas of Jordan

Community College Stories

Davidson County Community College (DCCC) in the fall of 2010 hosted Dr. Irina Petrovska, from University of St. Kliment Ohridski in Macedonia to teach English as a Second Language and Intercultural Communications in addition to working with faculty on professional development activities. Dr. Petrovska’s presence helped DCCC students broaden their knowledge of other countries and cultures and paved the way for increased understanding of global issues. Dr. Petrovska said: “I am justly proud of being a Visiting Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at a community college. I understand not many community colleges compared to universities in the USA, receive Fulbright Grants. Joining a community of nearly 47,000 academics and professionals from around the world who have come to the United States as Fulbright Scholars, to me, looked just like the finale of a long race…”

Montgomery County Community College and its partnering institution, Reading Area Community College, hosted a CIES recruited scholar, Dr. Cephas Agbemenu from Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya. According to Dr. Aaron Shatzman, Dean of Social Sciences: “Our experience with Dr. Agbemenu was fantastic. We were able to offer courses that focused specifically on African Art and African Art History, something we have never been able to do before. ”

Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale Campus hosted Dr. Min Ji from from the School of Foreign Languages and the Center for Women’s studies at the Sichuan Normal University in China during the 2013-14 academic year.  Dr. Ji developed and taught a course called “Topics of Contemporary Chinese Literature” and contributed on campus of her own interest and expertise in feminist Chinese Literature.  Dr. Paul McVeigh, Associate Vice President  of Global Studies and Programs reflected that “NOVA faculty and staff were able to learn much more about China’s diversity through Dr. Ji’s campus-wide presentation called  Beauty and Harmony: An Echo from MoSeo Culture.” NOVA’s main long-term goal is to forge International Partnerships and exchanges so the experience they had in hosting Dr. Ji and her continued willingness to collaborate from China  is very important.

HBCU Host Stories

Huston –Tillotson (HT) University, located in Austin, Texas (TX) hosted a CIES-recruited scholar from Kenya, Dr. George Ondego K’aol, from the Business School at United States International University, for nine months during the 2010-11 academic year. Dr. K’aol taught courses on “Global Business Strategies” and “Export-Import Operations” at the School of Business and Technology. “Through his teaching- writes Dr. Edmond, Dean of the School of Business and Technology, Prof. K’Aol helped the HT student community understand that during this current economic downturn, not only have the economies of the United States, Europe and Asia worsened, but also the economies of countries on the African continent.” Dr. K’aol’s presence helped foster openness and diversity of thought, experience and culture among all the students, faculty and Austin community.

Virginia State University, located in Petersburg, Virginia (VA), hosted Dr. Mustapha El Qadery, from the National Library and Archives, Rabat, Morocco during the 2010-11 spring semester. Dr. El Qadery taught beginning and intermediate Arabic language courses and an Islamic studies course focusing on gender issues in the contemporary Arab world.  Virginia State involved Dr. El Qadery in many community-oriented activities by collaborating with civic organizations and public schools throughout the Petersburg area. “Dr. El Qadery’s level of energy and passion about the subject matter was obvious; his desire to speak about the developments of the Arab Spring in the Middle East countries was engaging and provocative. Our students enjoyed his presence at all times” says Dr. Maxine Sample, Director of International Education at Virginia State University.

North Carolina Central University, located in Durham, North Carolina (NC), hosted Dr. Femi Faseun, a well-known Nigerian musician and Professor of Music at Lagos State University.   Dr. Faseun taught courses in ethnomusicology and introduced   traditional and contemporary elements of African art music into the curriculum. NCCU described this opportunity as: “very unique for it served as a mind-opener to our students interested to learn first-hand about African music from an African music scholar. As part of the global studies concentration, the course became an invaluable tool in situating music in specific cultures to students whose interests lie in global arts.”  

Fayetteville State University located in Fayetteville, NC hosted Dr. Harman Singh from the Department of Commerce at the University of Delhi, during the 2013-14 academic year.  Dr. Singh taught courses such as Operations Management, Microcomputer Applications in business as well as an introductory course in Computer Programming.  Dr. Singh’s time on campus not only provided an international perspective on curricula but also provided the opportunity for students to learn about career opportunities that might be available to them.  Dr. Singh said of his experiences that he was able to grow both personally and professionally as he was exposed to new technologies and to collaborate with people from a variety of disciplines.

MSI Stories

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona hosted Dr. Fatima Sadiqi in 2013-14, from Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University in Morocco to teach Ethics and Women’s Studies and History in addition to working with faculty on curriculum development. Dr. Sadiqi’s presence helped Cal Poly Pomona students and faculty broaden their knowledge of North African and Arabic Studies.  Dr. Patricia de Freitas, Professor Emerita said of the experience:  “Dr. Sadiqi has given us her “insider’s” view of the religious, cultural and political complexities of the Middle Eastern and North Africa regions.  This has generated an awareness of and desire on campus for greater understanding of the region.” Dr. Sadiqi was able to share her expertise in the surrounding community by building a greater understanding between Arab and North African world and the US.

Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale Campus hosted Dr. Min Ji from the School of Foreign Languages and the Center for Women’s studies at the Sichuan Normal University in China during the 2013-14 academic year.  Dr. Ji developed and taught a course called “Topics of Contemporary Chinese Literature” and contributed on campus of her own interest and expertise in feminist Chinese Literature.  Dr. Paul McVeigh, Associate Vice President  of Global Studies and Programs reflected that “NOVA faculty and staff were able to learn much more about China’s diversity through Dr. Ji’s campus-wide presentation called  Beauty and Harmony: An Echo from MoSeo Culture.” NOVA’s main long-term goal is to forge International Partnerships and exchanges so the experience they had in hosting Dr. Ji and her continued willingness to collaborate from China is very important.  In the wider community Dr. Ji gave a presentation to the Zonta woman’s club on Contemporary Chinese Women in the New Era Period which provided a springboard for questions about a variety of issues that affect the lives of women in China.

Averett College hosted Dr. Sholpan Gaisina from the Kazakhstan Institute of Economics, Management and Strategic Research during the 2013-14 academic year.  Dr. Gaisina taught several business courses, assisted Averett College in developing a South Asian focus for their undergraduate Business program and to establish a student exchange program.  “I was a part of the faculty; I could share my opinion, have discussions with colleagues, and be informed [on] all the difficulties of the teaching process. I have seen an American university from [the] inside. This is a priceless experience,” says Dr. Gaisina.

Fayetteville State University hosted Dr. Harman Singh from the Department of Commerce at the University of Delhi, during the 2013-14 academic year.  Dr. Singh taught courses such as Operations Management, Microcomputer Applications in business as well as an introductory course in Computer Programming.  Dr. Singh’s time on campus not only provided an international perspective on curricula but also provided the opportunity for students to learn about career opportunities that might be available to them.  Dr. Singh said of his experiences that he was able to grow both personally and professionally as he was exposed to new technologies and to collaborate with people from a variety of disciplines.

Central Arizona College hosted Dr. Sivasish Biswas from Assam University, Diphu Campus in Assam, India for the 2013-14 academic year.  Dr. Biswas taught a wide variety of courses from that included Indian culture and literature as well as language classes in Hindi.  Dr. Biswas’s experience at Central Arizona College also exposed her to cultural practices of Native Americans as they resembled the Mongoloid tribes in Northeast India.  Dr. Biswas reflected on her experience by noting: “I have become a truly global citizen cutting across all borders of culture, language, color, or religion. The welcome by my hosts and the volunteer host families will be cherished.” She encourages anyone who is willing to take on this challenge to pursue a Fulbright grant, for “cultural exchange happens with shared life.” Outside of the Central Arizona College, she shared various aspects of Indian culture and history with the  surrounding community.

FAQs | Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program

  1. My institution has limited resources. Will our proposal be accepted if we do not offer any salary supplement or in-kind support?
  2. My institution is not a Minority Serving Institution, Small Liberal Arts College or Community College. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R grant?
  3. My institution is a Minority Serving Institution that already has strong international ties. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R award?
  4. My institution enrolls a large proportion of minority students. Will we be given priority status under the S-I-R program?
  5. What U.S. institutions have participated in the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program?
  6. Our institution benefited so much from the S-I-R Program last year. May we apply to host again?
  7. My institution does not have much experience writing and submitting proposals. Should we even consider submitting a proposal for a Fulbright S-IR award?
  8. Can an institution apply to host more than one scholar at a time?
  9. Is preference given to proposals with named scholars?
  10. Our institution proposes to bring a scholar who is not in the humanities or social sciences. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
  11. Our institution seeks to bring a scholar to teach foreign language. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
  12. My institution would like to apply for an S-I-R award and name someone who was recently in the United States on a Fulbright Scholar award. Is this acceptable?
  13. My institution seeks to host someone who has limited English language skills. Is this acceptable?
  14. Our institution is interested in hosting a professional from another country, is this appropriate?
  15. What are the criteria for selecting institutions for the S-I-R award?
  16. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “Community resources” under “Information about the institution?”
  17. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “professional enrichment?”
  18. What kind of outreach activities should we include in our proposal?
  19. Which is the most important goal of the program: to serve the institution or to serve the scholar?

  1. My institution has limited resources. Will our proposal be accepted if we do not offer any salary supplement or in-kind support?
    Financial contributions are evaluated on the basis of the institution’s capacity to contribute. Institutions are encouraged to think creatively about ways they can provide in-kind support. Some examples of in-kind support include housing, transportation, on campus meal tickets, apartment furnishing, professional allowances for scholars to attend conferences, etc. Please consult the S-I-R Program contact for more information.
     
  2. My institution is not a Minority Serving Institution, Small Liberal Arts College or Community College. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R grant?
    Yes, all accredited U.S. institutions of higher education are eligible to apply to the program. However, the primary objective of the Scholar-in-Residence Program is to bring visiting scholars and professionals to minority serving institutions and/or to campuses that do not have a particularly strong international presence. Institutions not in the priority categories can enhance their chances by applying in partnership with a priority institution.
     
  3. My institution is a Minority Serving Institution that already has strong international ties. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Yes, the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence competition does not exclude institutions with existing international programs or those that have other opportunities to host visiting scholars, but these types of institutions need to demonstrate clearly how the proposed S-I-R will significantly enhance or expand any existing international program, serve the students and the campus, and benefit surrounding communities.
     
  4. My institution enrolls a large proportion of minority students. Will we be given priority status under the S-I-R program?
    Yes. In addition to giving priority to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), American Indian and Alaska Native Serving Institution (AIANSIs) including Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), , Asian American and Native American/Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs), the S-I-R Program gives priority to other Minority Serving Institutions whose composite student enrollment is at least 50 percent racial and/or ethnic minority.
     
  5. What U.S. institutions have participated in the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program?
    A list of recent participants is available here.
     
  6. Our institution benefited so much from the S-I-R Program last year. May we apply to host again?
    Immediate re-application to the program is discouraged.
     
  7. My institution does not have much experience writing and submitting proposals. Should we even consider submitting a proposal for a Fulbright S-IR award?
    During the spring and summer months, IIE/CIES will conduct a series of 16 Webinars to assist colleges and universities in preparing successful Scholar-in-Residence proposals. IIE/CIES staff is also available to provide guidance and feedback on draft proposals that are submitted to IIE/CIES up to two weeks before the application deadline. The S-I-R program welcomes first-time applicants and encourages all applicants to discuss their proposals with the IIE/CIES Program Officer (contact information included at the beginning of the guidelines).
     
  8. Can an institution apply to host more than one scholar at a time?
    Yes. However, only one proposal and one scholar will be funded.
     
  9. Is preference given to proposals with named scholars?
    No. The Application Guidelines For Institutions state that it is not necessary to name a scholar and notes that most U.S. Embassies and Fulbright Commissions abroad are quite willing to recruit candidates.
     
  10. Our institution proposes to bring a scholar who is not in the humanities or social sciences. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Reviewers assess whether the subject/discipline is approached as an international or public policy issue and whether the scholar’s activities have the potential to engage the entire campus. Institutions seeking purely scientific exchanges should not apply for the Scholar-in-Residence Program. All proposals must include a compelling argument for the impact of the S-I-R on the campus and community.
     
  11. Our institution seeks to bring a scholar to teach foreign language. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Proposals requesting foreign language teaching must also have the Scholar-in-Residence teach about their home country’s, customs, culture and society.
     
  12. My institution would like to apply for an S-I-R award and name someone who was recently in the United States on a Fulbright Scholar award. Is this acceptable?
    Preference is given to scholars who have not had opportunities to teach, study or conduct research in the United States for an extended period within the past five years. If you request a scholar with such recent experience in the United States, the proposal must give special justification (please check with IIE/CIES regarding questions about the eligibility of the scholar). The review committee may recommend the proposal on the condition that a different scholar be identified for the award.
     
  13. My institution seeks to host someone who has limited English language skills. Is this acceptable?
    No, the scholar must be able to lecture in English. The scholar’s proficiency in English should allow him or her to successfully perform their collegiate teaching duties and speak at community events.
     
  14. Our institution is interested in hosting a professional from another country, is this appropriate?
    Yes, provided the individual has the appropriate teaching experience. The S-I-R Guidelines encourage institutions to consider not only academics, but professionals in the media, government, the arts and from other fields. Professionals and artists have successfully participated in the S-I-R Program.
     
  15. What are the criteria for selecting institutions for the S-I-R award?
    There are two principal factors reviewers consider; (1) the benefits of the proposed program to the institution and (2) the quality of the program proposed, including: the academic and community outreach activities, plans for other campus activities, professional enrichment opportunities for the scholar and the sustainable impact of the S-I-R’s presence. Proposals that closely follow the Application Guidelines For Institutions tend to be the strongest and therefore more likely to be recommended for an S-I-R award.
     
  16. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “Community resources” under “Information about the institution?”
    This section should indicate what educational, social and cultural organizations, activities and events in the community might be attractive to a Scholar-in-Residence. These should be resources where the scholar can learn from the community and where the community can learn from the scholar.
     
  17. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “professional enrichment?”
    Opportunities institutions can provide for their S-I-R’s professional development such as attendance of professional conferences, introductions to colleagues in the same discipline at other institutions, collaborative research projects with faculty members, access to research or other academic facilities, etc.
     
  18. What kind of outreach activities should we include in our proposal?
    Provide letters from civic, religious, professional and cultural community organizations, schools and school districts and other groups and organizations expressing an interest in hosting the S-I-R for substantive public speaking 17 engagements and other outreach activities.
     
  19. Which is the most important goal of the program: to serve the institution or to serve the scholar?
    Service to the institution is the most important goal. Other Fulbright Programs support scholars who are selected to pursue their own research and lecturing interests.