Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program

The Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program assists U.S. higher education institutions in expanding programs of academic exchange. By supporting non-U.S. scholars through grants for teaching at institutions that might not have a strong international component, both the U.S. institution and the scholar grantee benefit.

One of the few Fulbright programs that serves institutions, S-I-R gives preference to Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Tribal Colleges and Universities, community colleges, small, liberal arts institutions, Asian-American and Native American/Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions - AANAPISI and American Indian and Alaskan Native - AIANSIs and Predominantly Black Institutions- PBIs. There are opportunities for other institutions to partner with preference organizations. Your institution is invited to learn how S-I-R can help advance its international presence, assist in faculty and curriculum development, and diversify the educational experiences of its students, scholars and surrounding community.

 

Grant Duration:

Contact Cecilia Kocinski-Mulder, ckocinskimulder@iie.org, (202) 686-6240

Last year, 46 institutions took advantage of the opportunities provided by the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program to internationalize programs, develop curricula and faculty, and diversify student and faculty experiences. Your institution is invited to learn how it can take advantage of S-I-R benefits in 2015-2016.

  • Building The Proposal

    If you are interested in participating in S-I-R, there are some steps you will need to take in developing a proposal.

    It starts with developing the proposed program your institution being submitted for S-I-R funding. The institution must determine whether it has a faculty member outside of the United States in mind for S-I-R funding or needs assistance in recruiting one for the program. This will factor into the S-I-R review process.


Community Colleges

Bellevue Community College, WA hosted a scholar from Brazil to help the college promote pluralism within our increasingly global society and to add a Latin American perspective to its international studies program and social science division. The S-I-R taught interdisciplinary courses in Latin American history, political science, economics and international affairs.

City College of San Francisco, CA hosted a scholar from the Philippines who assisted in establishing a Certificate in Philippine Language program-the first of its kind in the United States. In addition to teaching responsibilities, the S-I-R facilitated a series of speaking engagements and professional development sessions related to her expertise in Philippine language, literature and feminist issues in Philippine culture and society.

Illinois Valley Community College, IL hosted a S-I-R from Ghana who developed and taught a new course entitled "Introduction to African Political Systems." The scholar also served as a guest lecturer in courses with modules on Africa and participated in a series of speaking engagements with community leaders, schools and service organizations.

State University of New York-College at Cortland, NY hosted a named scholar from the Czech Republic who taught classes in women's studies, art history, and aesthetics. The S-I-R helped faculty to internationalize the college's curriculum and develop linkages in Central Europe.

San Juan College, NM in rural New Mexico received a theater director from Bern, Switzerland who team taught classes in the theater department. In addition, the S-I-R directed a multicultural production of a Greek tragedy and was available as an international arts resource person for the campus and local community.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities Hosting Scholar-in-Residence

Southern University and A&M College, LA The university system's College of Business hosted an S-I-R from Armenia to enhance its international business curriculum. The scholar taught economics and business courses and conducted seminars focusing on transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The S-I-R also participated in a variety of outreach activities in the local chamber of commerce and Rotary Club.

Saint Paul's College, VA The college, affiliated with the Episcopal Church, hosted a scholar from Nigeria. The S-I-R taught courses in Islamic studies, helped develop the new concentration in religious and philosophical studies, served as a resource person to faculty and gave guest lectures in the local community.

Savannah State University, GA The university received a scholar from the University of Ghana to teach and develop courses in literature and African studies. The S-I-R helped recruit students and faculty for the institution's Ghana study abroad program and served as a guest lecturer and resource person in the community.

Claflin University, SC The university hosted an S-I-R from India to teach and internationalize the business curriculum. He also delivered lectures concerning India's economic transformation at different colleges and business organizations in South Carolina.

Hispanic Serving Institutions Hosting Scholar-in-Residence

Otero Junior College, CO This small, rural community college requested a named scholar from Trnava University, Slovakia, to help internationalize its nursing program, which has been drawing increasing numbers of international students. The scholar added an important cross-cultural, comparative perspective on nursing. She also taught courses in cultural assessment and intervention, commonalities of nursing, and nursing management, and participated in the college's "Heritage Week."

Whittier College, CA Whittier's goal in applying for an S-I-R was to internationalize its innovative curriculum, increase study abroad opportunities, and expand exchange opportunities. To this end, Whittier requested a Humanities S-I-R from China who brought first-hand knowledge and awareness of Asian culture and traditions, and contributed to discussions about a new major in International and Cross-Cultural Studies.

University of the Incarnate Word, TX Most UIW undergraduates are "first-generation" college students with little international exposure. While UIW has experienced a growth in the Asian-American students on campus, there has not been a corresponding increase in courses that address these changes. The University requested a scholar from India as their S-I-R, who brought an international perspective to the teaching of world and American history courses, and was involved in many aspects of university life from curriculum development to student advising.

Universidad Metropolitana, PR UMET requested a visiting scholar from Brazil who enhanced the content of the environmental sciences curriculum, led a faculty team in developing a new course on environmental planning and conservation analysis, and gave guest lectures on campus and in the community in his field of expertise.

Liberal Arts Institutions Hosting Scholar-in-Residence

Austin College, TX requested a named scholar from the University of Hyderabad, India in the field of anthropology to help strengthen the college's Asian studies program by adding expertise on South Asia. Over the course of the year, the scholar taught several courses, including: population and society, cultural anthropology, introduction to Asian studies, and gender and development in local South Asia. He was also a featured presenter during the college's Asia Week and gave guest lectures to local civic organizations and the public schools.

Baldwin-Wallace College, OH hosted a specialist in environmental sciences from Ecuador who taught a course on Latin American environmental issues, helped the college develop its FLAC (foreign languages across the curriculum) program, and helped design an orientation program for students that participate in the college's study abroad program in Ecuador.

Beloit College, WI hosted a scholar from Kenya who helped internationalize its sociology and education curricula, brought social science perspectives to environmental and development studies courses, and strengthened the sub-Saharan African content in its anthropology courses. The scholar also taught courses on HIV/AIDS education and African Studies. She worked with faculty on curricular development and participated in outreach activities on and off-campus.

Roanoke College, VA hosted a scholar in the field of history from Morocco who taught courses on North African and Middle Eastern history and culture, developed faculty expertise on the Middle East, and contributed to the college's goals for global awareness as well as enhanced its emphasis on teaching non-Western cultures.

Chaminade University of Honolulu, HI, a native Hawaiian-serving Institution, hosted a professor from Germany who collaborated with its humanities department in teaching philosophy and history courses. He also brought a cross-disciplinary, European perspective to the university's undergraduate program by developing a new course on ethics and moral psychology, which has since become part of its curriculum. In addition, the S-I-R was instrumental in initiating a long-term partnership between Chaminade and the Free University of Berli.

May 20, 2014 | New proposals can be submitted
October 15, 2014 | The deadline for 2015-2016 proposals
December, 2014 | CIES external committee reviews proposals
January 2015 | CIES notifies applicants of review outcome
Jan. - Feb. 2015 | Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board review recommended proposals.
CIES confirms institutional funding
Jan. - April 2015 | Fulbright Commissions or Public Affairs Sections of U.S. Embassies abroad recruit and/or review prospective
scholars
April 2015 onward | CIES ISSUES GRANT PACKETS TO SCHOLARS

FAQs | Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program

  1. My institution is not a Minority Serving Institution, Small Liberal Arts College or Community College. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R grant?
  2. My institution is a Minority Serving Institution that already has strong international ties. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R award?
  3. My institution enrolls a large proportion of minority students. Will we be given priority status under the S-I-R program?
  4. My institution does not have much experience writing and submitting proposals. Should we even consider submitting a proposal for a Fulbright S-IR award?
  5. What are the criteria for selecting institutions for the S-I-R award?
  6. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “Community resources” under “Information about the institution?”
  7. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “professional enrichment?”
  8. What kind of outreach activities should we include in our proposal?
  9. Our institution proposes to bring a scholar who is not in the humanities or social sciences. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
  10. Our institution seeks to bring a scholar to teach foreign language. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
  11. Is preference given to proposals with named scholars?
  12. My institution would like to apply for an S-I-R award and name someone who was recently in the United States on a Fulbright Scholar award. Is this acceptable?
  13. My institution seeks to host someone who has limited English language skills. Is this acceptable?
  14. What U.S. institutions have participated in the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program?
  15. My institution has limited resources. Will our proposal be accepted if we do not offer any salary supplement or in-kind support?
  16. Our institution is interested in hosting a professional from another country, is this appropriate?
  17. Our institution benefited so much from the S-I-R Program last year. May we apply to host again?
  18. Can an institution apply to host more than one scholar at a time?
  19. Which is the most important goal of the program: to serve the institution or to serve the scholar?

  1. My institution is not a Minority Serving Institution, Small Liberal Arts College or Community College. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R grant?
    Yes, all accredited U.S. institutions of higher education are eligible to apply to the program. However, the primary objective of the Scholar-in-Residence Program is to bring visiting scholars and professionals to minority serving institutions and/or to campuses that do not have a particularly strong international presence. Institutions not in the priority categories can enhance their chances by applying in partnership with a priority institution.
     
  2. My institution is a Minority Serving Institution that already has strong international ties. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Yes, the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence competition does not exclude institutions with existing international programs or those that have other opportunities to host visiting scholars, but these types of institutions need to demonstrate clearly how the proposed S-I-R will significantly enhance or expand any existing international program, serve the students and the campus, and benefit surrounding communities.
     
  3. My institution enrolls a large proportion of minority students. Will we be given priority status under the S-I-R program?
    Yes. In addition to giving priority to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), American Indian and Alaska Native Serving Institution (AIANSIs) including Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), , Asian American and Native American/Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs), the S-I-R Program gives priority to other Minority Serving Institutions whose composite student enrollment is at least 50 percent racial and/or ethnic minority.
     
  4. My institution does not have much experience writing and submitting proposals. Should we even consider submitting a proposal for a Fulbright S-IR award?
    During the spring and summer months, IIE/CIES will conduct a series of 16 Webinars to assist colleges and universities in preparing successful Scholar-in-Residence proposals. IIE/CIES staff is also available to provide guidance and feedback on draft proposals that are submitted to IIE/CIES up to two weeks before the application deadline. The S-I-R program welcomes first-time applicants and encourages all applicants to discuss their proposals with the IIE/CIES Program Officer (contact information included at the beginning of the guidelines).
     
  5. What are the criteria for selecting institutions for the S-I-R award?
    There are two principal factors reviewers consider; (1) the benefits of the proposed program to the institution and (2) the quality of the program proposed, including: the academic and community outreach activities, plans for other campus activities, professional enrichment opportunities for the scholar and the sustainable impact of the S-I-R’s presence. Proposals that closely follow the Application Guidelines For Institutions tend to be the strongest and therefore more likely to be recommended for an S-I-R award.
     
  6. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “Community resources” under “Information about the institution?”
    This section should indicate what educational, social and cultural organizations, activities and events in the community might be attractive to a Scholar-in-Residence. These should be resources where the scholar can learn from the community and where the community can learn from the scholar.
     
  7. What are the reviewers looking for in the section on “professional enrichment?”
    Opportunities institutions can provide for their S-I-R’s professional development such as attendance of professional conferences, introductions to colleagues in the same discipline at other institutions, collaborative research projects with faculty members, access to research or other academic facilities, etc.
     
  8. What kind of outreach activities should we include in our proposal?
    Provide letters from civic, religious, professional and cultural community organizations, schools and school districts and other groups and organizations expressing an interest in hosting the S-I-R for substantive public speaking 17 engagements and other outreach activities.
     
  9. Our institution proposes to bring a scholar who is not in the humanities or social sciences. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Reviewers assess whether the subject/discipline is approached as an international or public policy issue and whether the scholar’s activities have the potential to engage the entire campus. Institutions seeking purely scientific exchanges should not apply for the Scholar-in-Residence Program. All proposals must include a compelling argument for the impact of the S-I-R on the campus and community.
     
  10. Our institution seeks to bring a scholar to teach foreign language. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Proposals requesting foreign language teaching must also have the Scholar-in-Residence teach about their home country’s, customs, culture and society.
     
  11. Is preference given to proposals with named scholars?
    No. The Application Guidelines For Institutions state that it is not necessary to name a scholar and notes that most U.S. Embassies and Fulbright Commissions abroad are quite willing to recruit candidates.
     
  12. My institution would like to apply for an S-I-R award and name someone who was recently in the United States on a Fulbright Scholar award. Is this acceptable?
    Preference is given to scholars who have not had opportunities to teach, study or conduct research in the United States for an extended period within the past five years. If you request a scholar with such recent experience in the United States, the proposal must give special justification (please check with IIE/CIES regarding questions about the eligibility of the scholar). The review committee may recommend the proposal on the condition that a different scholar be identified for the award.
     
  13. My institution seeks to host someone who has limited English language skills. Is this acceptable?
    No, the scholar must be able to lecture in English. The scholar’s proficiency in English should allow him or her to successfully perform their collegiate teaching duties and speak at community events.
     
  14. What U.S. institutions have participated in the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program?
    A list of recent participants is available here.
     
  15. My institution has limited resources. Will our proposal be accepted if we do not offer any salary supplement or in-kind support?
    Financial contributions are evaluated on the basis of the institution’s capacity to contribute. Housing or other in-kind contributions of substantial benefit to the scholar may be appropriate substitutes for a salary supplement.
     
  16. Our institution is interested in hosting a professional from another country, is this appropriate?
    Yes, provided the individual has the appropriate teaching experience. The S-I-R Guidelines encourage institutions to consider not only academics, but professionals in the media, government, the arts and from other fields. Professionals and artists have successfully participated in the S-I-R Program.
     
  17. Our institution benefited so much from the S-I-R Program last year. May we apply to host again?
    Immediate re-application to the program is discouraged.
     
  18. Can an institution apply to host more than one scholar at a time?
    Yes. However, only one proposal from the institution will be funded.
     
  19. Which is the most important goal of the program: to serve the institution or to serve the scholar?
    Service to the institution is the most important goal. Other Fulbright Programs support scholars who are selected to pursue their own research and lecturing interests.